Fast Fly

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning is FOREBODING

And the Merriam-Webster Word of the Day yesterday was EGREGIOUS. Seeing that word, I tend to think of GREGARIOUS, which means sociable, friendly, outgoing,. However, EGREGIOUS means somewhat the opposite: obviously or noticeably bad.

As I sat at my laptop pondering what to write re: FOREBODING, a fly landed near my hand. Before I could terminate his existence he was gone. Suggesting a phrase — the first two lines of a poem, redirected from Joyce Kilmer’s “TREES”? Sure, why not? Bear with me here…

Fast Fly

I think that I shall never see
a fly that’s slow enough for me,
a boldly lingering freebooter
’til I can reach the flyswatter.
One lands, but when I blink my eye
it’s on alert and ready to fly
attuned to my egregious thought
of rendering it a bloody spot.

It seems to feel a faint foreboding
as tiny nibbles it’s uploading;
senses my unkind intention,
anticipates swift intervention
to its dining as I leave my chair
to grab the swatter hanging there.
Yet snails along, as flies are wont,
my sluggishness it seems to taunt.

I lift my swatter, all prepared
to deal with any fly that’s dared
check out my home for food un-grazed.
However, soon as hopes are raised
it will not move ’til I bring down
my swatter – such a crack resounds!
It spooks the cats but, woebegone!
that teasing fly is off and gone.

Air Traffic Control

Image by Orna Wachman — Pixabay
Negotiate the narrow aisle,
find Zone 5 Seat 21;
stow baggage in overhead bins,
take your seats, fasten belts
and become sardines
squashed in a can.
As engines roar to life
you all pray those bins...
and your bladders...
stay shut for the whole trip.

El Condor Pasa?

I’m going back to the world of art to do a response to Crimson’s Creative Challenge #142

El Condor Pasa

“Here’s your study for today.”

Art student: “I have to paint that!”

Tutor: “Easy peasy.”

“But it’s so bleak!”

“Then add some interest. A fence, a river, a bird even. Create! Go wild with that brush.”

“If you say so…” He grabs a brush and starts dabbing.

After the last brush stroke, he calls his tutor over.

“How’s this? Ready for the Louvre?”

Tutor: “Um… Definitely unique.”

“I’m calling it, ‘EL CONDOR PASA’.”

“Looks like a robin hunting caterpillars.”

“Robin? Caterpillars! Ouch! We artists are sensitive people you know.”

“Yeah. So I’m here to toughen you up before the critics start firing their big guns. Try again…aim for something more abstract.”

The student grumbles, sets his masterpiece aside and sets another canvas on the easel. Splash, splash goes the brush.

Later…

“How’s this?”

“Definitely better! You’ll be a Van Gogh yet.”