Senryu Smiles

boy with B-B gun
aiming at the moon
big game hunter

young child
playing checkers with grandpa
bifocals

in the boy’s hand
fascinating frog, nickel a peek
peewee Barnum

half the morning
coffee and crosswords
newly retired

Image: Agata — Pixabay

Grad night

Here’s my response to the Ragtag Daily Prompt word: FLOUNCE

Emily checked the clock again, wondering if her date would be early or just on time. “Please don’t be late,” she thought. “Let’s get on with the show.” She’d looked forward to graduation all through high school; now the day had come and she was jittery as well as eager.

She straightened the many frills on her new dress and wondered what he’d think of it. Would he be embarrassed? As her Dad politely commented half an hour ago, it was a little over the top. Mom had decided to try a new dressmaker and Emily described the type of dress she wanted. On impulse she’d added, “I’d like something with a touch more flounce.”

Yes, she’d definitely said “a touch.” Somehow the concept hadn’t been communicated well. The gown Emily envisioned hadn’t at all corresponded to the dressmaker’s image of “a touch more flounce.” She hoped she’d be able to move around in all these ruffles — and not roast once the action get started. Worse, she was horrified they might make her look fat!

Image by Natalja Danilchenko — Pixabay

More of Montréal

I’m having fun recalling things about Montréal. Hope you these linguistic trials give you a smile.

French 1 newbie
Je suis née…
not je suis nue!

La rivière march?
Well my dictionary says
marcher means to run

Centre d’achats
sounds like sang de chat.
My tutor shrieks

Sound bites…
“Did you hate your supper?”
“No, I liked it!”

Notes for non-francophones:
Né (M) née (F) means born; nu (M) and nue (F) means nude.

Marcher means to walk like a person walks, or to run like a machine/car would run. La rivière coule, meaning flows. (Better as la rivière s’écoule.) Le camion (truck) s’écoule would get you a chuckle, too, I think.

Centre d’achats is a shopping center; sang de chat means cat’s blood. Yes, my tutor did shriek a bit over that one. 🙂

Francophones have trouble getting the right vowels, too, at times, plus they tend to tack on an “h” now and then. The hair is cool this evening. I hate pizza for supper. Did you hate some, too? Or leave it off, like Cockneys. ‘ave you seen ‘im today?

Dictionaries can bring such chaos. I corrected a French-to-English translator who used remove the apple heart, meaning core, because in the dictionary celery had a heart, so the apple must, too. Our word “fit” can mean like a garment fits, but also someone had a seizure. That has brought some intriguing translation woes.