The Wallpaper

Terry was measuring off the first strip of wallpaper when he heard the doorbell. He dashed down the stairs to answer. Glancing through the diamond porthole in the door he saw his friend Gavin standing on the step.

“Hi Gav. Sorry you had to wait but I was upstairs. Come on in.”

“Thanks. Just thought I’d see what you’re up to this morning.” Gavin glanced around. “Sasha not home?”

“Nah. We’re getting the nursery ready, got the wallpaper yesterday, so she went shopping for some accessories. Don’t know why the baby needs accessories, but you know how women are. I said I’d make a start at hanging the wallpaper. You maybe can help me– I’ve never done this before.”

“Oh, I don’t know… How fussy is she?”

“I think it should be easy enough to hang. All balloons. Come on up.” Terry led the way to the nursery.

Gavin looked at the wallpaper strip partly unrolled on the floor. “No kidding, all balloons! Are you sure you’re going to be happy with that when it’s on the wall? It’d make me dizzy.”

“Sasha thinks it’s perfect, so who am I to argue? My job is just to slap it on.”

Gavin eyed the repeating shapes with a frown. “Might be tricky to get it cut right.”

“No sweat. Just have to match these half-balloons at the edges.”

He knelt on the floor and rolled out a second strip next to the first, lined up the balloon and was ready to cut when Gavin said, “Wait a minute!”

Terry looked up. “Problem?”

“If you put those strips together that way every side balloon will be mismatched. See here, this balloon will be half red and half blue. I think the idea is to match the colors, not just the balloons. Blue with blue; red with red. Like this.” He took the roll from Terry and demonstrated.

Terry eyed the two strips. “What a waste of paper! This kiddie design stuff costs big time – and I’m sure Junior won’t care. But yeah. Sasha might not be too happy if they don’t match. Good thing you came along.”

With Gavin’s help Terry got the papering done quickly, then the two of them stood back to survey the overall effect. Gavin winced at the brightness of all those balloons.

Terry shrugged. “Wouldn’t have been my pick. But this is what she wanted and I won’t be spending much time in here. Come on, let’s grab a coffee.”

As soon as Sasha returned from her shopping trip Terry led her upstairs. “The job’s all done, sweetheart. Hope you like it.”

Gavin trailed after them, curious to see her reaction.

Sasha walked into the nursery and looked around. They observed that her face didn’t light up with joy as she studied the wallpaper.

“Something wrong,” Terry asked.

“I…uh.. I guess… I never thought… I mean, it looked great in the sample book but I didn’t get the picture of how a whole room would look with this on all four walls. It’s really pretty, but…uh…”

“A bit overwhelming,” Gavin suggested.

“Yeah. A bit.” Maybe we could paint two of the walls something plain.”

Terry huffed. “You mean paint over this new, expensive wallpaper?”

“Or take some of it down? Maybe we could reglue it and hang it… Maybe in the office?”

“No way!”

Gavin decided this would be a good time for him to disappear.

🙂

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning that inspired my little tale is REPEATING SHAPES
The image I’ve used is from Pixabay, created by AnnaliseArt

Morning Bounty

Good morning everyone. The morning is sunny, but we’ve a chilly wind and a temp of -16C, so it’s a good day to stay inside and admire the sculptured snow banks.

I see we have a GENEROUS supply of writing prompts, a real BONANZA of words and scenes to choose from. The Crimson’s Creative Challenge has been posted, though I’m not sure where this will get us. Looks like a dead end street. 🙂 Rochelle has posted the Friday Fictioneers prompt and the stories are rolling in. (Pardon the pun. 😉 )

I don’t know if I’ll get any responses done, though; I’ve planned a “tidy and mend” day. I was going to announce our success when we finally completed our extremely difficult Flutterbies jigsaw puzzle. We actually finished it Sunday afternoon — didn’t take us until spring after all.

Now on to my next project. I’ve told you that I’ve gotten enthused about acrylic painting, so last week I bought some brushes and got a few tubes of good quality paint when we were in the city on Monday. Yesterday I dug out a canvas from my “someday bin.” Someday has arrived! My evening reading time will be replaced with my new “splotch and dab” hobby. (Impressionist pictures really appeal to me, and they are very splotch-and-dab.)

Last night via internet I watched a tutorial from Ian Harris in Australia showing how to paint a simple sea and sky scene, with “woives and “sproiy” in the water and “claouds” in the sky. (It was worth listening to just to hear his Aussie accent!) He says he has a foicebook poige where he sells his demo paintings, if anyone’s interested.

Anyway, attempting to follow his EXAMPLE on my own canvas last night, I discovered that painting decent-looking clouds and frothy waves is not as easy to execute as he makes it seem. 😦 He’s an encouraging instructor, though, reminding his listeners that we’re learning and won’t do it perfectly at first. So I’ll keep practicing my fleecy clouds. Actually, the finished product didn’t look bad at all from across the room.

After my painting efforts were done, I had to do a small load of wash, as I’d forgotten about an artist’s smock and painted a nice turquoise blue splotch on the front of my dress, and decorated the cuffs of my fleecy grey sweater. Lesson 1A. The tablecloth is plastic, so can be chucked once I get past the beginner stage. 🙂

Early this morning we had a wonderful “good news” text: our grandson, age 18, had a visit with our pastors and will be sharing his “new birth experience” — his conversion, or experience of accepting Jesus as Lord — with the congregation Sunday morning. Family members will be invited to hear it in person; the rest of the congregation via streaming.

A note of explanation:
Our church doesn’t accept as members everyone who pops in and wants to be one. There has to be evidence that they are truly walking in the way Jesus and the apostles taught. Anyone who wishes to join the church must share with the congregation how God called them and how they repented of their sins and committed themselves to his ways.

The congregation considers the evidence — the changes they see and the person’s faithfulness so far — and ask whatever questions they may have about this person’s Christian life to date. Then every member is asked to vote: do they believe this person has made a genuine commitment to Christ? If the evidence is accepted, the person is baptized.

And that’s the news from our house today. I hope you’re all having a good day. One blogger calls Wednesday “Hump day” because it’s in the middle of the week. To the settlers here on the prairie winter seemed really long, but we find it incredible just how fast these days are flying by — isolated or not.

Morris, Goscinny, and Lucky Luke

The Ragtag Daily Prompt for today is SATIRE

Definition:
The use of humour, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people’s stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues. — Lexico
Satire applies to writing that exposes or ridicules conduct, doctrines, or institutions either by direct criticism or more often through irony, parody, or caricature. — Merriam-Webster

Some years ago when we were in Quebec a friend introduced me to the Lucky Luke, the Western “bande dessinée” (comics) originally by Belgian artist, Morris, and later by Morris and Goscinny — the artist who did the Asterix series. If ever there were artists that did satire, it was these two!

LuckyLukeChante.jpg

I recall one scene that was supposedly in the US Legislature where the austere governors of the nation carried on their dignified duties. A hilarious scene and a definite parody. “Shyster” one yelled. “Corrupt!” the other rejoined. There was the story where Lucky Luke got into the middle of an old family feud à la Hatfield + McCoy.

I recall his adventures with the Dalton gang, especially where they crossed the border into Canada. A sign read, “Canadian Border.” On the US side everything appeared normal, not a flake of snow. On the Canadian side deep snowbanks, frozen trees. All the men were loggers. The RCMP, Corporal Winston Pendergast, walked into a bar at closing time and said, “Gentlemen, it’s time to go home,” and everybody vamoosed. Then he ordered himself “A cup of tea, please, with a little cloud of milk.”

LuckyLukeBlizzard.jpg

Yes, I take my hat off to these two artists. They were masters of written satire and their illustrations were likewise hilariously fitting.

The Art of Jade Summer

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning is JADE. A great word and lots could be said or illustrated, but I’m going to keep with my Books for Christmas idea and write about an artist who publishes by the name of Jade Summer.

I’ve discovered these adult coloring books on Amazon; possibly other retail outlets will be selling them, too. She has a variety of summer and winter themes. If you’re into coloring, you may want to have a look.

Motifs and Mandalas

Hello everyone! I want to give a hearty welcome to my new followers; I notice a few more have joined just recently. I may not be interacting much this week, as I have down-loaded a trial version of Scrivener and plan to spend several days getting a handle on that. However, I’ll dig some articles and verses out of my archives that I hope you’ll enjoy.

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning is MOTIF, which is “a single or repeated design or color” according to Merriam-Webster. Like the mosaic in ceramic tile floors.

by David Zydd — Pixabay

This word also makes me think of those attractive mandalas that you often see in coloring books for adults. So beautiful!

By tammcd — Pixabay

Pink & Charcoal

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning was CHARCOAL. My first thought was of charcoal as a drawing medium. Some amazing pictures can be done in charcoal. But then I thought of the car colors my husband says were popular circa 1956: PINK & CHARCOAL.

1956 Ford Fairlane for sale #2319032 - Hemmings Motor News
If you have a hankering for “the good old days,” this lovely restored 1956 Ford Fairlaine is listed for sale in Hemmings Motor News (hemmings.com)