A Morning Prayer

Surf and sand.OR.jpg

Heavenly Father, am I too satisfied with what I’ve already
learned of You? Am I too content to rest in the knowledge
I’ve already gained? Bless me with a thirst to know more
of Your will, to gain yet more understanding of your ways.
There’s so much more for me to learn
of the depths of your grace.

“Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is as high as heaven…The measure thereof is longer than the earth, and broader than the sea.”
Job 11:7-9

Advertisements

I was Supposed to Be a Star

WHAT WENT WRONG?
I Was Supposed to Be a Star!

“For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the Lord, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end.  Then shall ye call upon me, and ye shall go and pray unto me, and I will hearken unto you.”
See Jeremiah 29:11-14

God’s Word says He thinks good thoughts toward us; if we look to Him for help He will bring our lives to happy conclusions both now and in eternity.

So what happened to poor Joseph?

Why was he sitting in an Egyptian prison for two years when he was supposed to be ruling the sun, moon, and stars? God had given him a spectacular dream where the sun, moon, and eleven stars (representing his brothers) bowed down to him. He took it as a divine promise, but his brothers captured him when he was alone, tossed him into a pit, then sold him into slavery.

To add insult to injury, his master’s wive took an impure liking to him and wanted to cuddle when the master was out for the day. When he refused and actually ran from her, in a fury she accused him of trying to molest her. Joseph was imprisoned for his crime. (Or in this case, failure to incriminate himself.) So here he sat in prison — far from being the object of anyone’s adoration.

Didn’t he have enough faith?  Wasn’t he praying enough? Did he stay upbeat in the dungeon? Did he cheerfully “bloom where you’re planted” and wait for the fulfillment of his dream, or did he sometimes feel like he must have missed the boat somehow?

He interpreted his fellow prisoners’ dreams and asked Pharoah’s wine-bearer to remember him and speak a word to Pharoah on his behalf. But when the servant got back to the palace he forgot all about justice for Joseph.

When Joseph was forgotten by the king’s wine-bearer for two long years, did he wonder if God had forgotten him, too?

It’s easy for us, looking back through history, to see how it all worked out, that God had the big picture planned and Joseph’s prison episode was one small scene. But Joseph had to live through it day by day, year by year, hanging onto a dream he believed was from God.

When I’m feasting in the Royal Palace or living on Easy Street, it’s not hard to see God has my good in mind. When joy and inspiration surround me I can feel I have a purpose to fulfill in life. But what about when everything has gone wrong, I’m nailed for doing what I believed was right, and now I’m sitting in some prison or exiled to a far country?

When everything’s a mess and tsunamis of depression hover on my horizon, ready to toss flopping fish in my face and wash me out to sea, can I still hang on, trusting that God means this circumstance for my good? Do I believe that I can learn something from any situation.

“It is good that a man should both hope and quietly wait for the salvation of the LORD.” Lamentations 3:26

Lord, deliver me from martyr pins, self-pity, self-scourging and righteous indignation.  Show me the truth about myself so I can accept what I need to accept and change the things I need to change. Grant that I may hold onto this quiet confidence that You are working things out for my soul’s salvation — my expected end in the mansion You have prepared. Come what may.

Reblogged from Christine’s Reflections, Aug 19, 2012

What DO Feminists Hate?

Monday Morning Musing

I was going about my morning as usual when I happened to check my SPAM queue and saw a title that caught my eye:

“If Feminists Hate This, It Must Be Good”

I didn’t open the e-mail, but I must admit the title IS thought-provoking. My mind immediately brought up various responses:
If feminists hate war, then war must be good?
If feminists hate child-abuse, then child abuse must be good?
If feminists hate drug-trafficking, and the sex slavery that often goes with it, then drug use must be good?
If feminists hate SPAM, then…

Ah, but… So much meaning hinges on the word THIS. Since I never read the message — which is undoubtedly an ad of some kind — I have no idea what “this” refers to. I just jumped on the title and thought, “Wait a minute. This is a false assumption!”

Rather than getting the complete picture, aren’t we sometimes inclined, as listeners or readers, to catch a few significant words and build our rebuttal on that?
“You said this, and it isn’t true.”
“She wrote thus and thus, and it makes no sense.”
“He carelessly asked for a dozen when he should have asked for precisely twelve!”

Looking back I blush to think of times where I’ve pounced on some short phrase and shook it like a rat, not listening for — or deliberately ignoring — the real meaning behind the statement. Yes, “Guilty as charged.” The speaker may have had a valid point but I’ve allowed one sentence to negate it.

Conversely, haven’t we all seen a child pick the part they wanted to hear and go from there?
Mother: “I don’t think you really should go along with them, but if you feel you have to do that I won’t order you stay home.”
Child to friends: “Mom says I can go.”

Another phrase comes to my mind. Over the years people have seized on this statement and taken it literally without ever exploring the context for the complete meaning.
Jesus said, “Judge not that ye be not judged.” (Matt 7:1)

These words from the Bible are frequently quoted, in fact they’ve become a motto for our times. They’re used to excuse a LOT of bad behaviour, to prove innocence of a sort. Usually comparatively speaking, like:

“Sure, I’m smoking pot, but who are you to judge me? You have a social drink now and then. Remember, the Bible says, ‘Judge not that ye be not judged’.”

Years ago I worked for a boss who smoked. Her sister nagged her about the danger of getting lung cancer. Then studies revealed that women who dyed their hair had a higher incidence of cancer. (It was slight, if I recall correctly.)

Well, the sister dyed her hair, so my boss justified her smoking with this ‘you’re just as wrong as I am’ approach: “My sister criticizes me for smoking, but she’s dyeing her hair. So who is she to judge?” Her argument didn’t affect her chance of getting lung cancer in the least, but it got her off the hook with her nagging sister.

In John 7:24 Jesus says, “Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgement.” Sadly, this sentence has never gotten equal billing with the “Judge not” line of thought.

In Matt 5:48 He tells his disciples, “Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect.”

Now wait a minute! What’s this about PERFECT? Who can ever be perfect?

The only way to find out what Jesus meant by this statement is to read the book of Matthew.

Just like the only way I’ll ever find out what “feminists hate” and why it’s so good is to read the e-mail. But I’ve deleted it. I really don’t want to know; the answer is not important to my life.

Christmas Wishes

lamp-18696_640

“In him was life; and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.
There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through him might believe. He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light. That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.” — John 1:4-9

Wishing every one of you a joyful, love-filled Christmas. My prayer is that you will each feel a special touch from the Lord as we rejoice in His coming.

The Waters of Babylon

The Friday Fictioneers prompt has come around again, thanks to the diligent efforts of our host, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields and a photo prompt donation from Roger Bulolt. (Please note the photo is copyright.)

It happens that I’m prepared for today’s prompt — though palm trees would have been a nice touch. 🙂  I was inspired back in spring to write a verse from Psalm 137 and stashed it away for the right opportunity. I thought of it when I looked at this morning’s prompt, so here goes:

PHOTO PROMPT © Roger Butolt

“By the rivers of Babylon where we sat down, yea,
we wept,
when we remembered Zion.”

“Sing!” soldiers commanded,
sick of our sobbing. “Sing
some cheerful song from your land.
Stop this wretched wail.”

Sing?
We who’ve seen our toddlers trampled,
our elders left to starve; our maidens
in the hands of these brutes.

Jerusalem, the beautiful city, ravaged;
the temple of our God in flames.
Sing? Not a chance!

“Vengeance is mine,” Yahweh declares.
He will repay in full measure,
oh Babylon!

Hush — the prophet speaks!
‘The fire shall purify but never consume;
the waters shall cleanse but not overwhelm
Jacob, my beloved.’ *

Yahweh has not forgotten us.
He will preserve his people
in the waters of Babylon.”

(*Isaiah 43:1-2)