Senryu Smiles

boy with B-B gun
aiming at the moon
big game hunter

young child
playing checkers with grandpa
bifocals

in the boy’s hand
fascinating frog, nickel a peek
peewee Barnum

half the morning
coffee and crosswords
newly retired

Image: Agata — Pixabay

“LOVE the Child”

The Ragtag Daily Prompt word for today is CONCRETE. I’ve probably posted this story before, but the wordplay is so suitable for this prompt. This scene took place somewhere in England, back in the 1950s — when it was still possible to give a child a cuff on the ear for misbehaving.

LOVE THE CHILD

A professional psychologist was constantly admonishing parents to “Love the child.” An expert in his field, the doctor encouraged all his clients and his neighbors as well: “Children need to be shown love and kindness.”

One day the doctor had a new concrete pathway poured in his back yard. A few minutes later he looked out and saw a neighbor boy slopping through the wet concrete. He rushed out, grabbed the boy, and was about to give him a cuff on the ear when a neighbor woman saw what was about to happen. She quickly shouted out her window, “Remember what you always say, Doctor. LOVE the child.”

“To which he replied, “I DO love him, madam — in the abstract. But I DON’T love him in the concrete!”

Contentions

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning is CHANGELING

Merriam-Webster gives these definitions:
Turncoat (archaic)
One child exchanged for another at birth, (usually a fairy child)
Imbecile
(archaic)
And I’m going to go with the first meaning, though it be rather archaic.

Illustration by ArtTower — Pixabay

No Changing Allowed!

Sister stamped her foot in fury. “Changeling! Turncoat! Traitor to the cause!”

“I’ve seen the light,” Brother responded. “It’s not an issue.”

“You were on my side before. Now you’re wimping out.”

“Having given the matter serious thought, I’ve realized that one choice is as good as the other.” Brother maintained his calm tone. “It’s no big deal.”

“Ha! If you’d been in Boston before the Tea Party, you’d probably have said ‘It’s no big deal. Let’s just pay the tax and not rock the boat’.

“It might have saved a war.”

“Heretic!” Sister punched his arm. “And this is a big deal!”

“Everybody raves about how great peace is. ‘NO MORE WAR,’ they say. But soon as they get passionate about some issue, they’re ready to take up arms. Like you now.”

“You must have been switched for my real brother at the hospital. If you were my true brother you’d see things like I do.”

Brother scowled. “Wow! Talk about over-reacting.”

“Somebody needs to remind you of what you said last month when this issue first came up. You’ve done a 180 switch.”

“All I said was, I think we should…”

“But you said just the opposite last month. You agreed with me then. Changeling. Traitor.”

Finally Dad spoke up. “Okay, you two. Rather than fighting about this – ”

“I’m not fighting about it,” Brother protested. “She is.”

“I’m not fighting, either! I’m just saying he can’t change his mind like this. Last month we decided we wanted to do Sea World. Now he’s saying let’s go to Yellowstone.”

Dad laid his hand on her shoulder. “Well, I’ll settle the matter. We’ll visit Yellowstone this summer and Sea World next year. End of the skirmish. And no sniping.”

“Who knows if I’ll even be alive next year? The whole world may lay in ashes!”

Dad frowned at her. “No Sniping. End of subject.”

Six-Sentence Story

I’ve taken advantage of two prompts to do my tiny tale today.
The Six-Sentence Story prompt this weekend was RAMBUNCTIOUS
The Sunday Wordle contains the following prompt words:
sunset, finish, string, spill, limit, heartbeat, trails, fairy, lacy, tick, stone, gate

And here are my six sentences, more a scene than a story, though:

“Beat you,” Andy shouted as he rushed along the narrowest of trails ahead of his sister, stepped on a conveniently placed stone and was over the fence in a heartbeat.
“Honestly, Andy, I don’t know why you’re so rambunctious this morning, but I’ve about reached my limit.”
“Come on, Lacy, don’t be a tick. Just step on that rock, spill yourself over the fence and we’ll see if some fairy has left a bit of gold in the meadow.”
“Gold indeed, you dreamer! The only gold you’ll see that way is the sunset – and maybe some buttercups in the woods as you dash through.”

Round They Go

Crimson’s Creative Challenge this week fits in nicely with some thoughts I had yesterday:

hula hoops
make another circle
through my years

Reading one of the “Constable” books by Nicholas Rhea – the series that inspired that old British series, Heartbeat. Rhea tells of how, in their village, fads would catch on, last a short while then disappear. Like hula hoops.
How well I remember hula-hooping as a girl. I wonder if the fad made a pass again in the 80’s, and I’ve seen my grandchildren playing with them. If I live long enough, they’ll probably be popular again. 🙂

Interesting historical tidbit:
Hula was unheard of, but hoop-twirling was popular in Great Britain in the 1300s. Medical notes from that era show doctors treating dislocated backs and heart attacks attributed to hooping. (If you’re interested in reading the whole history, click here .)

As Solomon once said, “There’s nothing new under the sun.”