A Slap of Diverse Weather

The Ragtag Daily Prompt for today is DIVERSITY

Which we have today. After a couple of weeks of mild Indian summer warmth with temps around 10-14 C (50-55 F, give or take) a diverse weather system arrived in the night and fine snow began sifting down on us. The temp today has hovered below 0C or 32F, so a lot of the precipitation has liquefied. But new snow started this afternoon and now we’ve a fluffy white blanket.

Quite diverse from the balmy day yesterday. I was refilling my shallow basin of water for the sparrows that I have in front of our living room window and they took great delight in splashing in it. I probably won’t need to set water out for the birds for a good long while. Mind you, we really welcome this snow. It’s been so dry here for so long.

Two days ago I listened to a webinar about Scrivener writing programme and found it very interesting. It’s one huge organizational writing “notebook” package plus, storing your manuscript broken into scenes, all your reference material, imports and exports files, compiles your work as an e-book, etc. I see it comes complete with various “how to” tutorials. My husband is definitely interested in giving it a whirl. Has anyone else out there tried it and did you like it?

Books to Fall Asleep On

I read once that if you’re having trouble falling asleep, start reading a rather boring book. Then, of course, someone else disputed this. Take an exciting book that will hold your attention and get your mind off the events/problems of the day. What do you think? Have you followed either of these suggestions and found success?

After a day of heavy caffeine intake, last night I wasn’t falling asleep like I wanted to, so I thought I’d start on a rather boring book, The Man Who Was Thursday, by G K Chesterton. I’d picked it up one time and hubby suggested I read it, so I read the first chapter Wednesday in between bouts of rearranging the living room book cases.

(Is anyone familiar with the Father Brown mystery series by G K Chesterton?)

Chapter One started in that old-fashioned “proper English” style and I assumed it would carry on in the same rather boring manner. But it got rather interesting at the end of Chapter One — and by the end of Chapter Two I was hooked. This daring young Scotland Yard detective infiltrates a cell of British anarchists and gets himself elected to a very important post. He’s about to sail off and take his place in the “Inner Circle” of seven, each one code-named after the days of the week, the organization’s head being “Sunday.”

I didn’t read further or I’d have been awake all night finding out what happened to him! There’s a hint in the beginning that he thought from time to time about the girl he met in Ch 1 and that he met her again at the end of his adventure, so of course I’d like to know how that panned out.

In contrast I downloaded a free e-book last week and read the opening a few days ago. It starts off with this preface: a lonely, destitute old man, broken by life. But it wasn’t always this way. He thinks back to his youth as a gentleman’s son, to the times when he had everything going for him.

Did I want to read the book and find out the bad choices he made? How things went wrong, how he ended up in this sad state? Nope.

This is a decision an author makes, knowing that it’ll kill some sales. Some readers may be eager to hear the story. For me, if I know the ending why should I read the book? What about you? Does this kind of opening make you curious to read the book, or do you find it rather off-putting?

Back to the topic. I’ve rarely found fiction I could fall asleep on. I need something like an account of the life cycle of a miller moth, or a recap of the War of the Roses.

So I gave up on sleeping last night, rather turned on the computer and did more DropBox sorting. Normally a repetitive task tends to make one sleepy — except that I kept finding stories & poems I wrote some years back and have forgotten the names of. By 3am and after a hot chocolate I was ready to sleep.

They say not being able to sleep is part of old age for some people. It’s definitely hit me. 🙂