Morning Smile

I was talking to my cousin last night — she’s just celebrated her 85th birthday — and she tells me she picked up a second-hand computer from someone who had one to get rid of. A brave new adventure and I hope it doesn’t lead to unnecessary frustrations. I can’t leave a message on her answering machine because she hasn’t mastered how to use her message manager — one bit of frustrating technology for her.

I asked her if she could type and she said, “I can learn.” Spelling will be a problem for her, though. Unfortunately my cousin not only lacks basic education, but also has some type of perception issue. She may read a short poem or quote she likes, but when she decides to copy it for me, she garbles the word order and line breaks. So she’s likely to see a lot of red lines on her screen as she types.

However, writing isn’t her goal anyway; I’m sure she didn’t get a printer in the deal. Another senior told her you can play games on a computer, so she’s looking forward to that. I hope it works better for her than her attempts to operate the TV remote control. When I spent a week with her a few years back, I had to call her cable company frequently and ask them to reset her TV because she’d hit the wrong button on the remote and switched it to “Play DVD” mode — then didn’t know how to switch it back. (Being somewhat technologically challenged myself, plus we haven’t had a TV since 1974, I couldn’t figure out how to fix it without help, either.)

Still, I have to admire her willingness and courage to try something new and am keen to see how this technological ‘step forward’ works for her.

Going through old files I came across this bit of wit, my adaptation of one of Murphy’s Laws. Hope it gives you a smile.

Speaking

Books: Rescuing Finley

I have great news for readers who like an inspiring contemporary fiction story. Dan Walsh is one of my favorite writers and the first book in his Forever Home Novels, Rescuing Finley, is FREE today on Amazon. NOTE: Last Day of giveaway.

Rescuing Finley CoverMy Book Review:

Two people in desperate situations, one abandoned dog.

Amy Wallace was a recovering meth addict, who lost her job and needed friends. Sad to say, two “friends” had in mind some shoplifting: they wanted to steal an expensive ring from a department store’s jewellery section. And they had in mind Amy should be the one to pocket the goods. Which meant Amy was the one who got caught and sent to prison.

Ever since he finished high school Chaz wanted to sign up with the Marine Corps. His mother protested angrily when he told her, “I signed up today. It’s for two years — but they’ll go fast.” She needed him to help her survive. And what about his dog, Finley? Did Chaz expect her to look after him?

Chaz was Finley’s whole world, the one human who loved him. Chaz’s mother barely tolerated Finley in her small apartment. We understand through his eyes how abandoned and confused he was when Chaz left — and never returned. Finley couldn’t know his master’s life ended on a battlefield, but he knew something was very wrong. Lost in her own grief Chaz’s mother couldn’t deal with a dog — especially a huge one like Finley. Feeling guilty but desperate, she dropped him off at an animal shelter.

Chris Seger’s life as he knew it also ended while on a mission in Afghanistan, when he stepped on a land mine. A permanent ticket home — minus one leg. Stateside, after months of therapy, he found work with an understanding and flexible employer, but he wrestled constantly with PTSD, depression and the nightmares. Then a pal suggested he look into this new program: service dogs for the disabled.

Dan Walsh does an excellent job of taking us through Chris, Finley, and Amy’s lives as they struggle to start again. Then he brings them together in a winning story of forgiveness and healing. At the same time he walks readers through a great program where prisoners work with dogs, training them as companions for veterans with PTSD.

I found this a terrific, heart-touching book and shed quite a few tears as I watched the story unfold. Five stars from me.

The Door of Yesterday

Bald eagle

LOOKING FORWARD

I’ve shut the door on Yesterday,
Its sorrows and mistakes;
I’ve locked within its gloomy walls
Past failures and heartaches.
And now I throw the key away
To seek another room,
And furnish it with hope and smiles,
And every springtime bloom.

No thought shall enter this abode
That has a hint of pain,
And every malice and distrust
Shall never therein reign.
I’ll shut the door on Yesterday,
And throw the key away—-
Tomorrow holds no doubt for me,
Since I have found Today.

—Author Unknown to me

Tempted but Resolved

Fandango’s One-word Challenge this morning: TEMPTATION

Merriam-Webster says: tempt implies the presenting of an attraction so strong that it overcomes the restraints of conscience or better judgment.

This word automatically brings to mind the Bible verse:
“Resist the devil and he will flee from you.” — James 4:7

You don’t have to be a Bible scholar to understand that thought. Should some temptation sidle up beside you, if you turn your face resolutely and head in the opposite direction, you will much more easily overcome the thing than if you look its way — even if you’re arguing with it.

In another sense, temptation is like that proverbial rat the dog played with, then buried, but he left the tail hanging out “just in case.”

Oxford English Dictionary’s definition of temptation:
the desire to do something, especially something wrong or unwise.

We do occasionally use the word TEMPTATION in the less menacing sense. We feel a desire to do something, though there’s some question involved. As we face the New Year, the clean page, the sense of starting-over, a lot of us are tempted to make New Year’s Resolutions. I have.

Is this wise? Do you make New Year’s resolutions? Do you keep them? Would you advise a friend to make one, or to abandon the idea?

To be on the safe side, my resolutions are a January-only thing. I’m hoping once started I’ll develop enough momentum to carry them on from there. But for the month of January I’m resolved to:
—spend more time in the quest for physical fitness. (Read: diet and exercise!)
My arthritis is getting me down and I’m resolved to start fighting back
—deal with sewing projects that have lingered in the spare room closet too long
—post a haiku a day on my other blog, Tree Top Haiku

O-E-D defines RESOLVED as firmly determined to do something.

As I understand it, the success of a New Year’s resolution depends very little on the project contemplated, and almost entirely on the resolve of the individual. I know from past experience that the temptation to do something else will certainly come along and crook an inviting finger, just to test the strength of my resolve.

Which reminds me of a quote I just read yesterday:  🙂

Anyone can do any amount of work, provided it isn’t the work he is supposed to be doing at that moment.

—Robert Benchley