What Goes Around…

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning is BOOMERANG

Friendship’s like a boomerang
when you give a friendly smile
you’ll find it coming back to you
as you trudge some weary mile.

–Author unknown to me
Verse from an old Friendship Book

The word BOOMERANG comes from an Australian aboriginal language; its appearance in the English language was in the 1820s. However, the concept of things coming back to you is ancient.

In Galatians 6:7 the Apostle Paul writes, “Be not deceived, God is not mocked, for whatsoever a man soweth, that also shall he reap.” Whether you’ve done good or bad; the Lord rewards you for your actions.

Even farther back, Solomon wrote “Cast thy bread upon the waters: for thou shalt find it after many days.” Eccl 11:1 This being written in the more positive sense.

Hinduism and Buddhism teach a system of karma, whereby the good you do sets in motion a chain of actions that rewards or punishes you by your lot in the next life. In general, Good or bad luck, viewed as resulting from one’s actions,” according to the Oxford English Dictionary.

In our day we’ve boiled it down to “What goes around, comes around.” We could even mention Bobby Burns’ “The best laid plans of mice and man go oft astray.”

Boomerang, in my mind, carries a more negative sense. Like getting hit in the back of the head by the boomerang you threw at someone else. Or like the fellow who planned to rob a store by crawling through the heating duct late one Saturday night. Plans went awry when he got stuck and there he stayed until the store opened Monday morning and police were called to investigate.

Waiting

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning is WAITING.

Like Punam, the RDP prompter this morning, I am waiting for spring. We’re in a bit of a roller coaster: -29 C two days ago, up to -5 yesterday afternoon, now -24 this morning. Thankfully the sun has power and makes the daytime cheery!

I’m going to respond to the prompt with these two haiku — maybe they’ll give you a smile this morning.

patient magpies
watch our picnic progress
hot dogs this time

still waiting
no ship on the horizon
treasures still at sea

Over at Word Buds I examine the long roots of the word CARROT.

 

If I Could Have My Wish

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning is MOST DESIRABLE

My response will be this verse by Edgar Guest; I find it quite inspiring.

A WISH

If I could have my wish it
would not be for wealth or fame at all,
but a firmer grip on fellowship
and all joys great and small
and I’d like to know as I come and go
much more of this world we share;
with a wiser mind I could always find
some joy in the task I bear.

If I could have my wish it
would not be for a strong man’s power
but a mind so filled with love ’twere thrilled
by the sight of a bird or flower,
and a heart so deep it could safely keep
all the good things warm within
so that I could turn, with delight, to learn
what each new day ushered in.

If I could have my wish it
would not be for some glittering prize,
but a faith so strong it could walk along
wherever my pathway lies.
My best I’d give to each hour I live,
and whether in peace or strife
I should like to stay to my final day
aglow with the joy of life.

From his book Collected Verse of Edgar A Guest
©1934 by the Reilly & Lee Company

A True-Blue Blonde

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning was EGGPLANT

I will confess my ignorance: I never heard of eggplants until I was an adult, buying my own groceries and cooking my own meals. One recipe book that came along with my husband was The Chatelaine Cookbook; one day I was looking through it and noticed a recipe called Father Fainted. This was an eggplant, tomato & herbs dish that apparently so impressed the writer’s father that she gave it this unusual name.

To peel or not to peel, that is the question. I’ve never pursued the art of creating eggplant dishes because I’m never sure how to peel the things—or don’t you? And since they’re quite bland with no enticing flavour of their own, I pass them by.

When I hear the word EGGPLANT, I rather tend to think of the French word AUBERGINE, which is used quite a bit in England, I gather. And in French an AUBERGE is an inn. I’m not sure just what the connection is there; maybe that’s what guests were fed when they stayed at roadside inns circa 1500?

Then I think of the colour AUBERGINE: “a dark grayish or blackish purple,” according to Merriam-Webster. Which brings me to this tongue-in-cheek verse, a senryu:

cheerful blonde seller
of produce
at roadside stand
aubergine roots

😉