Happy Feb 1

Good morning everyone! We have the first day of a new month, the first day of a new week. To top it off, we’re getting a bit more daylight every day. Last night I refreshed my blog with a new header and I’m on the cusp of a new hobby. Some things to be optimistic about.

Yesterday I listened to a speaker who talked about being grateful for the small things in life, like the beauties of nature our Creator has made for us to enjoy. Right now we have lovely white snowbanks everywhere, sparkling in the sunshine. And a resident something-or-other hibernating under the back of our garage. I see its warm breath is maintaining an air hole in the snow.

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning is ELOQUENT.
According to LEXICO this means:
Fluent or persuasive in speaking or writing. (A first cousin to LOQUACIOUS)
Clearly expressing or indicating something.

I came across an image at Pixabay one day, taken by Radovan Zierki. I imagined it fitting well with a writing prompt word like THIRST, so I downloaded it. Since I didn’t use it for an RDP, I’ll post it here.

Wouldn’t you agree that there’s something eloquent about this scene? I think of a river of mercy that flows, providing for even the smallest creatures. I tried to capture my feeling, perhaps not so eloquently, in a haiku.

 the heavens open
 rivers of blessing flow
 free samples

Bert & Harv Reminisce

Crispina has posted another weekly challenge HERE

Everyone’s welcome to join in the fun. Here’s how it works:
Every Wednesday I post a photo. You respond with something CREATIVE
Here are some suggestions:

  • An answering photo
  • A cartoon
  • A joke
  • A caption
  • An anecdote
  • A short story (flash fiction)
  • A poem
  • A newly minted proverb, adage or saying
  • An essay
  • A song—the lyrics or the performance

You have plenty of scope and only two criteria:

  • Your creative offering is indeed yours
  • Your writing is kept to 150 words or less

Once you have your response posted, visit her blog and do a PINGBACK, or leave the URL of your response post in her comment box.

Here’s this week’s photo:

And here is my response, 150 words on the dot.

BERT & HARV REMINISCE

“Look at that, Harv. What’s it gonna be when it’s done?”

“Maybe it is done? Some kind of modern art?”

Bert scowled. “More’n likely. Folks nowadays know nothin’ about art. When we were young you could look at pictures and know what you were seeing. Today it’s all splash-dab and heaven knows.”

“Maybe it’ll be one of them water slides?”

“Maybe. Fool kids apt to kill themselves gettin’ up that high. Nowadays they need crazy thrills to keep ’em happy. When we were young, Harv, it was fun enough to…”

“And see those flimsy supports holding that tube. Any weight on them and down the thing’ll come.”

“For sure. Nowadays they don’t know how to build anything solid. Watched my grandson put up drywall one day. When I was young, builders tested plaster with a hammer. You take a hammer to today’s flimsy stuff…”

“Let’s get us some tea, Bert.”

Not Moving Much

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning is STATIONARY and I found the perfect photo on Pixabay to illustrate this concept. Where do you think these fellows were going when they were turned to stone?

Statues.Meatle
Meatle  —  Pixabay

As the prompter mentions, STATIONARY is one of those words easily misspelled. Many a time I’ve see writers mistakenly use this spelling when they really meant the STATIONERY you write on, or vice versa.

Not quite as glaring, or open to misinterpretation as when someone writes “The hunter bagged a dear,” when they mean, “The hunter bagged a deer.” English is like that — you gotta watch out.

This morning I’ll start with a cup of hot coffee as I check the weather. Likely the school children will remain stationary in their beds for an extra hour this morning, too, as school is often called off when the temp goes below -40̊. And Environment Canada tells me that it’s -30̊ C with a wind chill factor of -43̊ – for US readers that’s -21̊ F with a wind chill factor cooling us down to -45̊ if we happen to venture outdoors. Here on the prairies we call that COLD.

We don’t have an attached, heated garage, so at this temp our automatic garage door won’t work — which means we tend to stay home whenever possible. If we must go somewhere Bob has to disconnect it from the mechanism and operate it manually with the cord and muscles to lift the door.

The temp is supposed to hit -27 C̊or -17 F̊ by this afternoon, a negligible difference. If we didn’t have warm houses on days like this we may well be as frozen as the fellows in the photo – but picture about 20 cm/ 8″ of snow everywhere to give the true impression.

Wishing you all a lovely, sunny day and a good cup of coffee.

Curious Roadkill

YOU SEE THE ODDEST CREATURES

Laid out on the highway
its feet in the air
I take a good look
as we pass it. No hair.

Just bumps on its back,
curled spines on its tummy;
its mouth sort-of open
its snout looking gummy

I ask my chauffeur
“What creature is that?”
He says with a chuckle,
“A dead rubber rat.”

Dead rubber rat
While I’m no artist, here’s my attempt at a dead rubber rat. Highway pic courtesy of Pixabay.

Adventures Await

Good morning! We are in the sunshine as I write this, but clouds in the west may bring a shower later today. We had a day of rain Tuesday, a heavy shower Thursday, another shower yesterday… It appears the Lord has decided to refill our sloughs that were cracked and dry at the beginning of June. During our extremely dry spring months we’d never have predicted this much rain in summer. The flowers are lovely and the lawn lush. Needs mowing.

On Tuesday morning I was working with my g-mail account and somehow wiped out the delivery of same. So most of this week I wasn’t able to access my g-mail through Windows, though I can still get it through Google and on my phone. Yesterday I noticed that it’s being delivered as usual. Don’t know how it righted itself, but I’m glad it did. I actually have two g-mail accounts and the one I haven’t been able to get through Windows for months; it was the attempt to rectify that problem that shut the other account down. Do I dare try again?

On Thursday I was back to digging up family tree roots, trying to find some record of my great-great-grandfather’s brother David, who came to Ontario around 1833 along with his three brothers. The others settled in Oxford County; I’ve heard that David moved up to Waterloo County. Thankfully so many records are available to us through the internet. Sad to say, though, every one of his brothers and their offspring gave their sons the same names.

In the city yesterday I noticed a huge motor home roll by. A nicely set up motel room on wheels. A person could almost imagine the life of adventure awaiting…

This morning I saw this image on Pixabay and started to ponder possible captions and quotes that might go with it. Something like, “I’d rather risk a tumble now and then than spend my days peering out of a shell.”

Below are a few applicable quotes I found on goodreads, but you’re welcome to leave your suggestions in the comments.

Snail.Capri credit

“An adventure is only an inconvenience rightly considered. An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered.”
― G.K. Chesterton

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the
courage to continue that counts.”
― Winston S. Churchill

“You cannot swim for new horizons until you have
courage to lose sight of the shore.”
― William Faulkner