Things We Do For Our Good

The Ragtag Daily Prompt this morning is FOR OUR GOOD.

I’m thinking now of the many things we regularly do for our good. For one thing, we take multi-vitamins and other medications. I don’t know where my husband’s blood pressure would be if he didn’t have medication to regulate it.

I take a tiny synthetic thyroid pill every morning. Before the doctor discovered my thyroid was no longer functioning, I was so cold all the time. One time I was looking for my sweater and my daughter commented, “Maybe we should move to Florida so you can be warm for once.” And my husband told her, “If the sun went behind a cloud in Florida, your mother would put on a sweater.”

I have arthritis and find that glucosamine helps. In fact, if I forget to take it for a few days, I start waking up in the morning with headaches. I’m also very thankful for pain-killers. I can’t imagine how life must have been back in the day when liquor was about the only pain-killer known in the western world. Or laudanum, an opiate.

My husband has been dealing with macular degeneration and gets injections to keep this under control. Getting a needle in the eye might seem like a dreadful thing, but the only other option is blindness, so his doctor does this, and he suffers this treatment, for his good — and we are very thankful it works.

Experiment.Pub DomNow I think of the millions of people working behind the scenes for our good, trying to make our environment safer, healthier, and more convenient. Researchers, inventors, food handlers, manufacturers, health inspectors, law officers. They may be doing it for a paycheck, but since what they do ultimately benefits me, I want to let them know I appreciate their efforts.

Now that we have a virus to deal with, health authorities and the government have decided that, for our good, we should self-isolate. So we’re doing our best to respect their wisdom. In the end it will be debated whether it was really for our good, or what should rather have been done.

I need to say thanks, too, to all the Happiness Engineers at WordPress for making blogging the enjoyable experience it is. I doubt we realize how much they do behind the scenes to keep us safe from spammers and hackers and up-to-date with technology.

I’m also thankful for the friends who’ve told me some things for me good. No, I may not have appreciated it at the moment, sometimes outright rejected it and I’ve even fired back with a sharp rebuttal at times. But later, turning over their thoughts, advice — yes, even sarcastic comments — I began to see a little light in it, some area where I could improve.

So I’ll enjoy my many blessings. Thinking this all over, I’ll say with the song writer, “Lord, I thank you for the good folks in my life.”

Masked Warblers and DNA

My husband’s cousin owns a nice bit of farmland right by the Saskatchewan River. He raised cattle, but he and his wife also set up some cabins on their yard and called the place Leaning Tree Guest Ranch. Though they’ve retired now, for years they offered guests a place to stay and enjoy the beauties of nature. One of the things they advertised: because no pesticides had ever been used on the land, this property boasted the largest number of native songbirds in Sask.

One summer my husband and I rented one of their cottages for a few days. In addition to enjoyable visits getting to know our relatives, we spent hours touring the lovely woods. Cousin Paul had made a nice lane right beside the river and kept this trail open for guests to wander.

At some places this lane narrowed down to just a foot path. One morning I was ambling along this path watching the antics of the common yellowthroats, tiny warblers that seemed to decorate the bushes around me like little yellow blossoms. Hyper, curious and cheerful, these cute birds are blessed with distinctive black masks somewhat like a raccoon.

I soon noticed that they were as interested in me as I was in them. They flitted into nearby bushes trying to get a better look at this visitor passing through so I sat down on a fallen log for about fifteen minutes and let them scrutinize me. Soon the branches a few feet away were a-flutter with yellowthroats hopping around seeking better viewing points and holding animated discussions about this odd creature. It’s quite a turn-around for me to be watched by the birds — and really unique to be discussed so openly. Being human — and females are very prone to this — I wondered what they thought of me and how I measured up to others of my species they’d observed.

Thinking of their cute little masks led me to pondering the variation in the warbler genetic pool that produces this unique feature. Some types of warbler have only one yellow spot on the tail while others are totally black and white.

My mind hops over to the marvels of the genetic pool in general. Which leads to some serious questions about the theory of evolution with regard to genetics and DNA.

A Simple-Brained Creature Ponders Evolution

According to the theory of evolution, as we were taught it in school, the earth was sterile. A boiling chunk off the sun and totally dead. The basic elements were present in molten form — guaranteed to kill any living organism. Eventually, they say, this sphere cooled and everything solidified. Except the water. Just why the water didn’t all evaporate into space, how it formed an atmosphere, is a mystery to me, but anyway…

Then one day a cell floating in the ocean came alive. Boink! Hello, world.

I lack faith here. I can hardly comprehend that a tiny pebble, a drop of water, or any other basic element of earth, would suddenly come alive. And not just start breathing air — or filtering oxygen from water — but also have the capability to reproduce! Did it divide? Or did it mate and thus reproduce? Mind-boggling.

Human cells divide all the time, according to the direction of the DNA. Any living cell —even a one-celled life form — must have DNA. So where would the DNA come from?

And then, could this new one-celled being contain in its DNA enough variation to produce a man, a dinosaur, a kangaroo, a mouse, a bird, a butterfly, an octopus, a reptile, a tree, a flower, a melon? According to evolutionists, all these and more eventually evolved from that one cell. I turn this thought over in my mind and come up with another question:

If the DNA to produce such variety were present in this initial one-celled creature, why did it take millions of years (according to the theory) to show up? These days if you have in one couple the DNA for red-hair and black hair, you’ll see this variation in the offspring — and definitely in the grandchildren, where other DNA is mixed in to produce an amazing display.

However, if the DNA to produce all that variation didn’t exist in that first living cell, from where did it come? It must have been added to the mix as time went on — but how? Can DNA that wasn’t initially present in a cell — like the DNA for scales or feathers or fur — somehow come into it from the atmosphere? More mind boggling concepts.

Some talk about genetic mutations and we see this happening today. We see mutations producing dwarfs, albinos, people with a sixth toe, etc. A child may have a harelip just like great-grandpa, but we never see a baby born with a beak, red eyes, a mask, a forked tongue, or talons. The DNA just isn’t there to produce this kind of variation.

According to most religions there is/was a Creator — in English we say “God”; French all him “the Eternal One.” Believers say this Eternal God designed all the creatures of the earth and gave each the particular genetics of their species, with potential for some variation. He also gave every species the ability to reproduce after their kind. And we see that He gave each species a DNA capable of some variation. And He gave them life — because life was his to give.

Now this concept is easy for me to grasp. Nothing mind-boggling here — if we can accept that God always was, even before the earth was.

sometimes it seems the whole theory of evolution is a cloak for “We will not accept that there is a Creator, an Eternal God.” Yet this is a theory its originator, Charles Darwin, tried to play down before he died. He advanced it as a theory, not as an unquestionable truth.

The Tide Comes In

I read this little anecdote years ago and have retold it in my own words. Thought I’d share it with you today.

A youngster from an inland English city was taken on a day trip to the seashore for the first time. It was an amazing outing; he stared in awe at the vastness of the rolling sea and listened with interest as his father and others around him explained the wonder of oceans and tides.

Then he enjoyed an hour or so of paddling around in the sea and playing on the beach. When it was time to go he wanted to take along some sea water to show his mother. So his dad found him a bottle, which he filled halfway and wrapped in his towel for the ride home.

Later, when he was carrying in his things from the trip, he told his mum all about his wonderful visit to the ocean and showed her the sample he’d brought home.

She thrilled to hear the excitement in his voice and examined the bottle he held up. “That’s great, dear! But why did you only fill the bottle half full?”

“I’ve left room for the tide to come in.”

This clever lad may have gone far in the world of science. 🙂

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Speaking of tales of the sea, did you hear about the terrible accident when a red cruise ship collided with a purple cruise ship? All the passengers were marooned.