The Constant Sea

Image by K Moser — Pixabay

The salt smell of the sea, the foamy breakers, the incessant screaming of the gulls in their wild play. These familiar sights and sounds soothe old Matt as he walks along the beach. When life is out of kilter he wanders down to the beach again to watch that constant rolling reminder that life goes on. There’s something solid about the sea. The thought makes him smile. It’ll be here ’til the end of time.

He delights in recalling the days of long ago when he worked with his uncles on the Doughty Daisy before a vicious storm tossed her on the rocks. He sees again the line of fishing boats heading out to sea, imagines the wind, the spray, the thrill of it all when, as a young deck hand, he was part of the crew harvesting the sea.

He thinks of the wild storms that held them in port for several days – or worse, swept down on them while they were filling their nets. All hands on deck back then, fighting to ride the waves and keep the equipment – and each other – from washing overboard. Those were the days when you worked, boy!

The fishing isn’t good now, the new crews tell him. Too many fish harvested by the factory ships; stocks haven’t had a chance to replenish like they should. Cod are about gone, they say, and rarely do you find the big tuna anymore.

He turns to watch the gulls wheeling, ever on the lookout for some tasty gift from the sea, and squabbling over it when they find it. Ah, now they’ve spotted something further up the beach. A couple of gulls have landed beside it, one’s carefully inspecting it while the other argues “finders-keepers” with his mates in the air.

“Now what do you suppose those birds have found?” Matt slowly makes his way over to the spot. By the time he gets there the gulls have flown away. He looks down and laughs. A tube of Paradise Suntan Lotion – Economy size. Just what he needs. He sticks it in his pocket; there’s a trash can up along the walkway.

Fandango’s One Word Challenge: INCESSANT
Your Daily Word Prompt: SUPPOSE

Bert & Harv Reminisce

Crispina has posted another weekly challenge HERE

Everyone’s welcome to join in the fun. Here’s how it works:
Every Wednesday I post a photo. You respond with something CREATIVE
Here are some suggestions:

  • An answering photo
  • A cartoon
  • A joke
  • A caption
  • An anecdote
  • A short story (flash fiction)
  • A poem
  • A newly minted proverb, adage or saying
  • An essay
  • A song—the lyrics or the performance

You have plenty of scope and only two criteria:

  • Your creative offering is indeed yours
  • Your writing is kept to 150 words or less

Once you have your response posted, visit her blog and do a PINGBACK, or leave the URL of your response post in her comment box.

Here’s this week’s photo:

And here is my response, 150 words on the dot.

BERT & HARV REMINISCE

“Look at that, Harv. What’s it gonna be when it’s done?”

“Maybe it is done? Some kind of modern art?”

Bert scowled. “More’n likely. Folks nowadays know nothin’ about art. When we were young you could look at pictures and know what you were seeing. Today it’s all splash-dab and heaven knows.”

“Maybe it’ll be one of them water slides?”

“Maybe. Fool kids apt to kill themselves gettin’ up that high. Nowadays they need crazy thrills to keep ’em happy. When we were young, Harv, it was fun enough to…”

“And see those flimsy supports holding that tube. Any weight on them and down the thing’ll come.”

“For sure. Nowadays they don’t know how to build anything solid. Watched my grandson put up drywall one day. When I was young, builders tested plaster with a hammer. You take a hammer to today’s flimsy stuff…”

“Let’s get us some tea, Bert.”

If I Were A Reporter

Today’s article at The Write Practice was written by best-selling author Jerry B Jenkins and will interest anyone who’s hoping to earn an at-home income writing. He shares ten types of writing jobs a person could take on to earn an income while working at becoming a best-selling author buoyantly afloat on incoming royalties. (My words, not his.)

One of two fifteen-minute exercises suggested is to imagine yourself doing the type of writing that interests you: columnist, speech writer, screenwriter, journalist, blog content writer, etc. and write a piece in that style.

For example, if you’d like to be a JOURNALIST, write a newspaper article about something that happened to you this morning. I’m going to go with that, and try to incorporate a few other writing prompts into my tale. (Okay, didn’t really happen — but I did hang up two wren houses this morning.)

The Ragtag Daily Prompt for today is LIMP
Jibber Jabber with Sue prompt is CREATE
The Word of the Day prompt is NEW

Ladder.morneau olivier
Image by morneauolivier — Pixabay

An eighty-two-year-old Aurora woman was injured in a nasty fall this morning, breaking her wrist, dislocating her shoulder, and badly twisting one knee while attempting to hang a wren house in a tree. The accident occurred around 9 am at 448 Shady Elm Place. The injured woman, Margaret Fallwell, explained that she so much enjoys listening to the wrens sing and wanted to create a new nesting site closer to her house before the birds return from the sunny south.
To this end she set up a ladder and had managed to climb up with said bird house in one hand and a hook in the other. Unfortunately, Mrs Fallwell found once she’d gained the top of the ladder and begun screwing in the hook, her grip on the tree trunk was not secure enough. She sustained multiple bruises and scrapes trying to keep herself from falling; however she was not successful and tumbled to the ground.
A neighbor, noticing her lying limp beside the ladder, called 911 before rushing to her aid. Police, fire, and ambulance personal were dispatched to the scene. Meanwhile Mrs Fallwell, with the neighbor’s help, managed to get up off the ground. She was taken to the hospital where she received treatment for her injuries.
Sargent James Nelson, spokesman for the Aurora City Police, strongly urges residents, especially seniors, to seek qualified help with any home improvements that involve the use of a ladder. “It may seem like a simple job,” he stated, “but the consequence of a fall may be a broken hip or other injury that will incapacitate the victim for many weeks. The elderly are especially susceptible to broken bones and a longer recovery time. It’s not worth the risk.”

We Witness a Drive-By Shouting

At 7:30 last night I was just finishing up my shift at the Villa, the seniors’ residence where I cook a few meals every week. My husband, who was waiting for me to finish my work, asked if I could hear a siren. He’d already alerted the residents that something unusual was going on outside, so they were all watching from the large picture window that faces the car port.

We saw a Fire Department vehicle, sirens blaring and lights flashing, drove into the Villa parking lot. A moment later we had the opportunity to witness first-hand a Drive-By Shouting.* We were forewarned that this would happen, but it was to be a surprise for the residents.

Two of our seniors had birthdays yesterday; Melvin turned 86 and Wilbert 91, so their families, together with the Villa board arranged this birthday party on wheels. Wilbert’s great-grandson and a friend drove up to the carport in a sort of dune buggy with flashing lights; they jumped off and fastened a large banner between two pillars on the outside of the carport, facing the picture window. “Happy Birthday Melvin & Wilbert,” it read.

Then they led a long procession through the carport, the two men’s families, Villa Board member and a number of others from the congregation. Our guess is at least twenty vehicles passed through our carport, with passengers honking and waving — much to the delight of the two “birthday boys.” Many vehicles were decorated with signs and balloons; in the back of one pickup two young people held up a large plywood sheet with Happy Birthday painted on it.

As they say, “A good time was had by all.”

Actually, we later heard that the local Fire Department had been involved in an earlier drive-by shouting, together with friends and family, for a Mrs Smith who turned 95 yesterday.

*I don’t know how widely used this term is, but a Moose Jaw reporter recently wrote about “the increase in drive-by shoutings” in that city, so I’m borrowing it. When folks are supposed to be self-isolating, they find creative ways of interacting. And there’s no ban on drive-bys.

I’m happy to say that our residents — and most residents of seniors’ & nursing homes in the province — have escaped the virus thus far. The stats I’ve heard today for Saskatchewan are: 301 diagnosed with Covid-19; 187 recovered; 4 deaths. So we’ve much reason to be thankful to date.

The Ragtag Daily Prompt for today is BAN

Grannie Brown

chocolate-chip-cookies-940428_640
Image: Pixel 1 from Pixabay

Soft-hearted dear, Grannie Brown
was friend to the children in town.
When the smell of her baking
spread hopes of partaking,
in minutes, guess who’d be around.

🙂

This limerick, a tale from “the good old days,” is my contribution today to National Poetry Month.