Down With Updates; Up With Golf

This afternoon I spent half an hour looking through a book of quotations that would say something along the lines of, “Stop changing things!” Or maybe something about curiosity scrambling success.

Hmmm… hasn’t that been done? I don’t know who said it, but I definitely agree with: “The cause of problems is solutions.”

You see, I was setting up a post, scheduling it for tomorrow morning. And the “Justify” is gone now from my tool bar. If I edit a published post, I can justify it, but not when I’m done the initially writing. Son I’ve posted this and then done the EDIT to justify it. 😦

Used to be, when I clicked onto my blog, I could hit the My Sites at the upper left-hand corner and the drop-down menu would give the choice of Posts > Write New. Since the newest system update, I have to click on My Sites, which takes me to Stats, where there’s no Posts option. So I go to the bottom and click on Site Admin, which brings the main Site Administration menu, where I choose Posts, and then get the choice of All Posts or Add New.

Hunting through my book of famous quotes, I came across this one by Douglas Rushkoff, which resonated with me at the moment:
“We are looking at a society increasingly dependent on machines, yet decreasingly capable of making or even using them effectively.”

Anyway, I did go ahead and write my post, and wondered if the “new Block Editor” might have a display that included Justify. (Now we need the quote about the danger of curiosity.) The new Editor has no buttons to do anything. The text is considered a block and that’s that. I wanted to insert a picture and can’t. It goes in its own block.

I’m sure there are writers who find this much improved over the system we’ve been using, but not me. I found this new Block Editor a pain — but how do I get back to the old familiar “Classic Editor”? I tried this and that, had about decided this was the end of my blogging life, but finally did figure out how to reverse the thing and go back to the old. So I did gain some knowledge through all this.

As Voltaire so aptly said it:
“One always begins with the simple, then comes the complex — and by superior enlightenment one often reverts in the end to the simple. Such is the course of human intelligence.”

And I’m hoping WordPress will go back to the simple one-click-on-the-side-menu for doing new posts.

I did come across a quote from Clint Eastwood, and maybe it’s the best advice for update-resistant sorts like me?
“When you’re not interested in trying new things, that’s when you should start hitting golf balls.”

Well, golf would be a completely new game for me and I might have trouble understanding birdies from bogeys. However, I’ve played croquet before and golf can’t be that much harder, right? You just hit a ball, eh?

An Old-Timer Speaks

For today’s tribute to National Poetry Month, I’m going to publish a verse by that multi-faceted poet, writer of umpteen dozen verses, Author Unknown. Born in the year 001, last I heard he — or she? — is still alive and kicking. Perhaps I should say THEY are,  just in case it’s a couple?

However, I’ve heard that the coming of Google Search — an invasive species if ever there was one! — is threatening the existence of the whole clan of Unknowns.

An Old-Timer Speaks

You laugh at us old-timers
and maybe youth has cause,
for when your hair gets gray and thin
you don’t expect applause.

Perhaps we’re not so handsome,
perhaps we’re not so spry
but when youth gets as old as us,
then youth won’t wonder why.

For we have fought the battles
and we have led the van,
and made this life an easier road
for many a younger man.

And he will do tomorrow
a lot of things that pay
because old-timers thought them out
and tried them yesterday.

We know the world is changing
the ways of trade are new;
men put new labels on their goods,
new roofs on houses, too.

But still the old foundation
that some old-timers laid
remains the cornerstone of all
the progress we have made.

Options & Frustrations

We have a lovely spring-like day with a temp of -2 C as I write this. Perhaps I should be out walking off my frustrations instead of writing about them, but they say writing is therapeutic, so here’s my tale:

What I wanted was

Dance Shoes + font
(Thanks, Keith, for the fonts tip)

Dreaming of future poetry book covers, you know.

Buying single fonts can get pricey, I’ve discovered, plus you have to buy a “Desktop” license which covers personal use of the font plus, if you wish, an e-book cover font.

But then I saw several Creative font packages produced by SummitSoft, sold by STAPLES, a Canadian office supplies company. With special decorative fonts for holidays and such. YES!

No.

I bought and installed the package last night, but my computer says (a long-winded form of) “No dice!” To be specific, the prompt I get when I try to install them in my current fonts selection is:
“Although new computers can handle up to 1000 installed fonts installed at any time, you should never have more than 500 fonts installed to maintain the best performance. The more fonts you install the slower your computer will become.”

When I hit TEMPORARILY ACTIVATE I get:

“Access violation at address xxx in module ‘Font Management System xxx’…etc.”

I’m told that Windows has close to a thousand fonts installed. That is not to say oodles of different styles. Rather, there seem to be about five different serif type fonts (like TNR, Georgia), five different sans serif type fonts (like Arial, Verdana), plus their Italic & Bold variations, and hundreds of almost identical  fonts. Yes, some minute variations but basically the same standard serif & sans serif fonts. In addition there are a few Courier types, as well as more rounded serif & sans serif versions like Americana & Tahoma.

You will also find a few basic fonts with a bit of flair like Seagull and Arimo, some more unique fonts like Poster Bodoni and Bernhard Mod, a few hand-printed styles like Broadway Copyist. Cursive fonts are Script,  Freehand591,  and Gabriola.

We went into the Windows font programme and discovered that where we get the Western versions of Jhenghei, YaHei, Yi Bati, LiU and Ming LiU, etc., these show up as Chinese and Japanese type character fonts in the windows menu. And you can’t delete them to make room. “Microsoft protected font” the prompt says. We did succeed in deleting the few Arabic and Greek, languages I can’t write in anyway.

So here I am with this marvy fonts package and I can’t even open it to have a look at what fonts are in it, never mind actually use it. Mind you, I’m technologically challenged. It could well be there’s some tech-whizzes out there — probably ten years old — who’d have the package up and running in minutes.

So if you’re thinking of adding a fancy fonts collection to your computer, be sure to have one of those whizzes standing by to assist you.When it comes to technology, options can definitely lead to frustrations. 🙂