An Old-Timer Speaks

For today’s tribute to National Poetry Month, I’m going to publish a verse by that multi-faceted poet, writer of umpteen dozen verses, Author Unknown. Born in the year 001, last I heard he — or she? — is still alive and kicking. Perhaps I should say THEY are,  just in case it’s a couple?

However, I’ve heard that the coming of Google Search — an invasive species if ever there was one! — is threatening the existence of the whole clan of Unknowns.

An Old-Timer Speaks

You laugh at us old-timers
and maybe youth has cause,
for when your hair gets gray and thin
you don’t expect applause.

Perhaps we’re not so handsome,
perhaps we’re not so spry
but when youth gets as old as us,
then youth won’t wonder why.

For we have fought the battles
and we have led the van,
and made this life an easier road
for many a younger man.

And he will do tomorrow
a lot of things that pay
because old-timers thought them out
and tried them yesterday.

We know the world is changing
the ways of trade are new;
men put new labels on their goods,
new roofs on houses, too.

But still the old foundation
that some old-timers laid
remains the cornerstone of all
the progress we have made.

Options & Frustrations

We have a lovely spring-like day with a temp of -2 C as I write this. Perhaps I should be out walking off my frustrations instead of writing about them, but they say writing is therapeutic, so here’s my tale:

What I wanted was

Dance Shoes + font
(Thanks, Keith, for the fonts tip)

Dreaming of future poetry book covers, you know.

Buying single fonts can get pricey, I’ve discovered, plus you have to buy a “Desktop” license which covers personal use of the font plus, if you wish, an e-book cover font.

But then I saw several Creative font packages produced by SummitSoft, sold by STAPLES, a Canadian office supplies company. With special decorative fonts for holidays and such. YES!

No.

I bought and installed the package last night, but my computer says (a long-winded form of) “No dice!” To be specific, the prompt I get when I try to install them in my current fonts selection is:
“Although new computers can handle up to 1000 installed fonts installed at any time, you should never have more than 500 fonts installed to maintain the best performance. The more fonts you install the slower your computer will become.”

When I hit TEMPORARILY ACTIVATE I get:

“Access violation at address xxx in module ‘Font Management System xxx’…etc.”

I’m told that Windows has close to a thousand fonts installed. That is not to say oodles of different styles. Rather, there seem to be about five different serif type fonts (like TNR, Georgia), five different sans serif type fonts (like Arial, Verdana), plus their Italic & Bold variations, and hundreds of almost identical  fonts. Yes, some minute variations but basically the same standard serif & sans serif fonts. In addition there are a few Courier types, as well as more rounded serif & sans serif versions like Americana & Tahoma.

You will also find a few basic fonts with a bit of flair like Seagull and Arimo, some more unique fonts like Poster Bodoni and Bernhard Mod, a few hand-printed styles like Broadway Copyist. Cursive fonts are Script,  Freehand591,  and Gabriola.

We went into the Windows font programme and discovered that where we get the Western versions of Jhenghei, YaHei, Yi Bati, LiU and Ming LiU, etc., these show up as Chinese and Japanese type character fonts in the windows menu. And you can’t delete them to make room. “Microsoft protected font” the prompt says. We did succeed in deleting the few Arabic and Greek, languages I can’t write in anyway.

So here I am with this marvy fonts package and I can’t even open it to have a look at what fonts are in it, never mind actually use it. Mind you, I’m technologically challenged. It could well be there’s some tech-whizzes out there — probably ten years old — who’d have the package up and running in minutes.

So if you’re thinking of adding a fancy fonts collection to your computer, be sure to have one of those whizzes standing by to assist you.When it comes to technology, options can definitely lead to frustrations. 🙂

Morning Smile

I was talking to my cousin last night — she’s just celebrated her 85th birthday — and she tells me she picked up a second-hand computer from someone who had one to get rid of. A brave new adventure and I hope it doesn’t lead to unnecessary frustrations. I can’t leave a message on her answering machine because she hasn’t mastered how to use her message manager — one bit of frustrating technology for her.

I asked her if she could type and she said, “I can learn.” Spelling will be a problem for her, though. Unfortunately my cousin not only lacks basic education, but also has some type of perception issue. She may read a short poem or quote she likes, but when she decides to copy it for me, she garbles the word order and line breaks. So she’s likely to see a lot of red lines on her screen as she types.

However, writing isn’t her goal anyway; I’m sure she didn’t get a printer in the deal. Another senior told her you can play games on a computer, so she’s looking forward to that. I hope it works better for her than her attempts to operate the TV remote control. When I spent a week with her a few years back, I had to call her cable company frequently and ask them to reset her TV because she’d hit the wrong button on the remote and switched it to “Play DVD” mode — then didn’t know how to switch it back. (Being somewhat technologically challenged myself, plus we haven’t had a TV since 1974, I couldn’t figure out how to fix it without help, either.)

Still, I have to admire her willingness and courage to try something new and am keen to see how this technological ‘step forward’ works for her.

Going through old files I came across this bit of wit, my adaptation of one of Murphy’s Laws. Hope it gives you a smile.

Speaking