Something Good to Share

I just came across an interesting blog challenge and it sounded like such a positive idea I decided to participate. The heading is, “Tell me something good.” Check it out HERE.

And now for the something good:

The canola fields are in full bloom now, both the fields around our yard and the ones we see as we drive down the road.

Canola

Photo courtesy of PIXABAY

And a bonus “something good”:
I’ve been checking the swallow nests around the yard, especially the one I can peek at from my sewing room/spare bedroom window. When I looked last week I saw this (actually two little heads):

Tree swallow

Photo courtesy of PIXABAY

This week it appears the babes have flown from two of the nests. A new generation to swoop through the air around here.

 

On Writing Less

Agreeing With Steven King

Last week I finished Steven King’s book On Writing. I won’t rave about it, since his advice is like we writers hear continuously. Should you decide to launch into it anyway, note that that he firmly espouses the vocabulary of the common man. Personally I could do without the graphics, though he does use four-letter words sparingly. But I cheerfully admit that he does have many good tips on writing clearly — and the sales to prove that he isn’t just whistling Dixie tunelessly.

While he and I are playing in an altogether different ballpark — I’ve never even cracked open a novel he’s written and don’t intend to — we do meet companionably in the stands when it comes to good writing skills. One point being Adverbs. In most cases they should be struck out.

Yes, when it comes to adverbs, King is pointedly blunt. He states emphatically* that writers should snip the adverbs, especially flowery ones, and I heartily second this advice. Adverbs, he maintains uncompromisingly, slow the reader down. (One might add that if they are six syllable ones, they categorically do slow the reader down.)

Reading late one evening, I related sleepily to my husband that Steven King and his friends very wittily played a party game using dialogue tags + adverbs, like “We’re having a great time,” the plumber said flushingly. (I may not be quoting SK exactly, but you get the point. They got rather off-colour at times.)

Mind you, a person could have some fun with that:
“We’ll get him yet,” the dogcatcher growled doggedly.
“Here. I’ll finish that off,” Blimpy said expansively.
“Hold still, will you! This will only take a moment,” the surgeon said sharply.
“Caught any fish yet?” the newcomer asked fishingly. “No. They just aren’t biting,” the old angler snapped bitterly.
“I’ve killed five people this morning,” Steven King said horrifyingly.

If you’re reading a book on a lazy Saturday afternoon at the beach and you’re up for some chuckles, you may not mind wading through a slew of adverbs. But how much humor does one want to mix into horror? Very little. Mysteries, thrillers and their ilk are meant to move breathtakingly along, not amble meanderingly.

I’m writing this for a reason — besides satisfying the demands of the *daily prompt word over at Word of the Day. I’ve just finished a mystery novel and, while the story was interesting and well plotted, it definitely could have benefited from an editor skillfully wielding a red pen. I plan to do a book report shortly. 🙂

Preserving the Daily Prompt

A Quick Look at Six Word Prompt Sites

As most WordPress bloggers know by now, WordPress Daily Post has bailed and bloggers have been left in free-fall. There are oodles of writing sites that offer word, topic, and sentence prompts, but they lack the interaction that the blogging community enjoyed through The Daily Post. Some bloggers have become frequent back & forth visitors, even good friends over time. But wait! Parachutes of different cloths and colors have been popping up to fill the gap. Our Word of the Day Challenge has not been left to fall by the wayside.

Up From the Rubble

The Daily Post may have become estranged from its blogging community — it died, actually — but a dozen or more bloggers like Scott and Fandango have done the honorable thing and offered their services. Vehemently refusing to be disconnected from each other in what was once the Daily Post community, a number of them have set a precedent, starting a new blog offering Your Daily Word Prompt.

I only wish one of today’s prompt words would be ANALYTICAL — an adjective a friend once applied to me. Another word suitable for this particular post, would be OPINIONATED. But poets would sigh in frustration and haiku writers would abandon all hope. There’s not much you can add when the prompt word uses up five or six of your seventeen allowed syllables.

And in my opinion, this is the tendency of the new prompters. A challenge it may be, but my brain is too indolent to conceptualize stories about collaboration and camaraderie. Give me simple any day. Nevertheless, many thanks to all of you who’ve dished up this great sampling to suit everyone’s palate.

Need a New Word? Check Here:

Daily Addictions word for today:  RUBBLE
This new blog, only for word prompts, has a nice front page with a lot on the sidebar including a list of other writing challenges. Uses InLinkz to connect contributors.
Prompt words last week: indifferent, dub, authority, respect, gasp, ancient

RAGTAG Community word for today:  PRECEDENT
The Home page header image was chosen to fit ragtag theme of this new, only for word prompts, blog. For some reason it’s duplicated, giving the blog a quite ragged up-front look. Home page is one where Recent posts plus pic are displayed. Seven bloggers each offer a word prompt on their day. Bloggers connect through pingbacks.
Prompt words last week: rejuvenate, heart, pond, Italian, check, shaken

Fandango‘s word for today: ESTRANGED
If you’re a person who doesn’t like clutter, Fandango’s busy Home Page is disconcerting, especially those two eyes staring at you. 😉 This blogger has added a daily word prompt to his repertoire, but has kindly listed One-word Challenge in his top menu so you can pop into it easily. He’s been faithfully posting words this month and bloggers have definitely rallied, connecting by pingbacks.
Prompt words last week: allegiance, artifact, cerebral, preposterous, almost, stark

Over at thehouseofbailey, Scott’s daily prompt: PARACHUTE
This is his blog, so his own various posts are mixed in. A clean home page, easy on the eyes, the prompt word found as a tab on the far right in the top menu. Most of his word prompts are versatile and easy for poets to use. Bloggers connect by pingbacks.
Prompt words last week: commemorate, deport, hid, perceive, love, employ.

Your Daily Word Prompt word for today: Honorable
This is a new site, prompt words only. Clean look overall. Personally, I don’t care for the chunky header + letters, nor the gray background. I prefer a bit of background color, but never have liked gray. On the other hand, easy-to find prompts + dates are displayed in neat cubes. Bloggers link through pingbacks, as with most of these sites.
Prompt words last week: lake, amicable, perpetual, adulation, wrangle, situation

Word of the Day Challenge word: Vehemently
Four bloggers have combined their talents to produce this new “Alternate Haven for Daily Post Mourners.” I’d give this blog an A+ for appearance, love its colors and open look, the neat header. But I’d drop down to a D rating for prompt words; these gals use the heavyweights. Haiku writers, these aren’t apt to appeal to you.
Prompt words last week: epiphany, possibility, squabble, dalliance, anticipation, camaraderie

Swimmers is just getting into the swim of things and hasn’t offered a word every day yet. This blogger’s new site, designed to fill in for Community Pool as well as offer a daily word prompt, has a nice clean look about it. Time will tell how Swimmers manages to keep fresh water in the pool.

And there you have my thoughts on what I’ve sampled in the smorgasbord of one-word daily prompts. For convenience sake I’ve reworked my BLOG ROLL at right so that for a time you’ll find these listed under Writing Help.

Writing Prompt Sources

Like so many of you, I read the announcement last week that WordPress is discontinuing some of its regular features, including its Daily Prompts on May 31st. I haven’t been using their one-word prompts for a long time; nevertheless, this announcement sparked my curiosity. I decided to have a look at how many other sites on the net offer writing prompts.

Hello Mr Google… WOW! I could write a story a day for a hundred years with what’s available out there.

Some sites are maintained by publishers like Writer’s Digest. Some are blogs by published authors like Graeme Shimmin and John Matthew Fox. (For your convenience I’ve put their links at the bottom of my sidebar under Writing Help)

Searching specifically, you can find random first line generators, random plot generators, random character generators, movie script generators. There are prompt sources for teachers, for students, for songwriters. There’s one titled, “Twenty-one writing prompts to help you finish an entire novel this summer.” There’s even “80 Letter-writing prompts” from Compassion International.

Just for curiosity I clicked on THIS ONE and generated a random set of ideas; you can click the buttons and come up with a story line that suits your fancy. Much like WriterIgniter, a site I’ve used before.

Just for fun I clicked the buttons and this is what I came up with:
MC: A young man in his late teens who is very wise
2nd character: A woman in her late thirties who is very lively
Setting: The story begins in a nursing home.
Situation: something precious has been lost
Theme: It’s a story about justice
Character action: MC reluctantly becomes involved

This combination called to mind a real happening, back when I worked in a seniors’ home. Something precious really did go missing. I don’t know if the truth was ever revealed, so I’ll have to fake it. Stay tuned for my tale — with details changed to protect the guilty. 🙂

The Daily Post also has a free e-book of writing prompts that can be downloaded as a pdf. Get it HERE.

When I go to Amazon.ca and do a Writing Prompts search, again I’m bowled over by the 84 pages of books containing writing prompts — and I see a lot of these are “Read Free with Kindle Unlimited.”

The down-side of picking a prompt at random instead of using a central source like Daily Post Prompts is lack of the sense of community. You’re on your own; there aren’t hundreds of people using the same word or photo. For those of you currently connecting via the Daily Post will you miss this? Will you try another community like The Write Practice (link in side bar) or one of the various Flash Fiction groups going?

And for anyone reading this post, what writing prompts sources have you found useful?

The Typhoon

omiri-gate-story.jpg

Photo by Nicki Elisha Shinow

The storm lasted four days. At first the rain poured down in buckets, later it sounded like the whole heavens was pouring down on the surrounding mountains. Villagers huddled together all through the typhoon, covering their possessions as best they could, praying they wouldn’t be washed or blown away.

The oldest of the elders remembered a deluge like this back in their youth. They recalled the year of hunger and poverty after. But most of the people living in the area had never seen such a storm. They wept to see their precious soil washing down the mountain. The small plateaus that sustained them were sliding into the lake down in the valley. Where would they plant their crops?

It would take many months to haul earth back up the mountain in baskets. The elders nodded. It would be so.

Finally the storm passed. All over the mountain folks shook off their stupor and wandered out to survey the damage. So much had been lost! They were shocked to see how the lake had swallowed up so much of the valley below. Even the Omiri gate stood in water.

They shook their heads. This would bring hardship. Every summer visitors came in droves to stand in this gate where the great prophet had once stood and shared his wisdom with his disciples. The locals had always welcomed the pilgrims. Their coming brought much income to the surrounding villages that hosted and supplied them.

Some despairing, some tearful, the people made their way back to their homes. They could see the churning clouds of hunger on the horizon.

The elders nodded. It would be so.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Story written in response to today’s The Write Practice exercise. Photo courtesy of Unsplash.com, a site for free images.

Janey’s Future

Time for another Friday Fictioneers tale and as usual, I can’t resist putting in my hundred words worth. In spite of the fact that Sandra Crook has donated the photo of a friendly looking old tree, there’s been murder and mayhem, death and accident in a number of tales this week. (Oh, and one hugging tree. Trust Eric to squeeze his alien in somehow. 😉 )

This Charge of the Write Brigade is being commanded as usual by Major Wisoff-Fields, DFFA, ATP. If you’d like to contribute your own tale hop over to her blog and click the Blue Frog, which will morph into a trusty charger on which you can ride into the fray.

PHOTO PROMPT © Sandra Crook

JANEY’S FUTURE

“Wish he’d listened. Ditched that rotten ladder!”

Janey stared at the tree. “Chan never was one for taking advice.”

I looked around. “Can you run this place alone?” With two tykes and another due soon? Dumb, but what do you say?

She shook her head, overwhelmed. “I should sell.”

I reached for her arm. “I got an idea… You been a good wife to Chan, Janey…and a good mom. He was so lucky. I know I’m some younger than you, but…do you think…”

She considered me awhile; my heart pounded something awful.

Her eyes sparkled. “Yeah. I think.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Historical fact:
It wasn’t a park but a prairie homestead, and the suddenly widowed Mary was riding home from her husband’s funeral with her single brother-in-law, who also lived on the farm. Seeing her desperate situation, he proposed marriage. She saw the wisdom in this; in those days he couldn’t stay helping her on the farm without raising a LOT of gossip. So they turned the team around, headed back to town, and found the preacher. Tough times call for some quick decisions.

Personal note:
I’m putting the finishing touches on a pdf of my book, Silver Morning Song, and would like to give some away in exchange for some honest feedback. (And hopefully generate a few reviews on Amazon or Kobo.) If you’re interested and have the time, please let me know. I can send pdf, mobi, or epub.

Silver Morning Song is a collection of poems and short stories that consider the delightful world around us and the trials of home and family as well as Christian life. In a voice sometimes humorous, sometimes serious, in short stories and parables, the writer tells of folks facing issues, decisions and temptations. These are interspersed with accessible poetic descriptions of the natural world and the changing seasons.